top of page
Search
  • The Sound Cafe

Christine McVie Fleetwood Mac Singer-Songwriter Dies Aged 79



Christine McVie, the British-born Fleetwood Mac vocalist, songwriter and keyboard player whose cool, soulful contralto helped define such classics as "You Make Loving Fun," "Everywhere" and "Don't Stop," died at age 79.


Her death was announced on the band's social media accounts. No cause of death or other details were immediately provided, but a family statement said she "passed away peacefully at hospital this morning" with family around her after a "short illness."


A statement by the band said of McVie:


"We were so lucky to have a life with her.


Individually and together, we cherished Christine deeply and are thankful for the amazing memories we have. She will be so very missed."


In a post on Instagram, Stevie Nicks wrote: "A few hours ago I was told that my best friend in the whole world since the first day of 1975, had passed away.


I didn't even know she was ill... until late Saturday night. I wanted to be in London, I wanted to get to London - but we were told to wait.


So, since Saturday, one song has been swirling around my head, over and over and over. I thought I might possibly get to sing it to her, and so, I'm singing it to her now.


I always knew I would need these words one day... It's all I can do now."


Her death is the first among Fleetwood Mac's most famous incarnation of McVie, Nicks, Buckingham, drummer Mick Fleetwood and bassist John McVie, Christine's ex-husband. In recent years, the band had toured without Buckingham, who was kicked out in 2018 and replaced on stage by Mike Campbell and Neil Finn.


Fleetwood Mac started out as a London blues band in the 1960s, and evolved into one of the defining makers of 1970s California pop-rock, with the talents of McVie, Nicks and Buckingham anchored by the rhythm section of Fleetwood and John McVie. During its peak commercial years, from 1975-80, the band sold tens of millions of records and fascinated fans as it transformed personal battles into melodic, compelling songs. The McVies' breakup – along with the split of Nicks and Buckingham – was famously documented on the 1977 release "Rumours," among the bestselling albums of all time.



Website: www.fleetwoodmac.com




bottom of page